Thursday, August 14, 2014

Some miscellaneous observations about our life in London

It's hard to find a regular bag of chips (crisps). Most of the time, the bag of chips is filled with six or so smaller, individual-size bags. It's really useful when you're researchers taking bag lunches to the British Library every day, like us! We had to wonder why, though, considering it's really wasteful of the plastic. We think it's for portion control. Those sensible Brits! And I have to laugh, because it really does work. The one normal bag of chips we did buy here in London got eaten almost in its entirety (yes, by me) one night where we weren't really hungry and didn't end up making a real dinner. Oops!

Generally in London, you keep to the left side of the hallway, which makes sense because one also drives on the left side of the road. Except for that one Underground station (Green Park) which asks you to keep to the right for no discernible reason. But at the British Library, stairs are a free-for-all, no doubt because the library is full of scholars of different nationalities. This means that no one knows what side of the stairs to use, and it's kind of a mess especially because the stairs have really sharp corners.

I got through lots of books on the tube, 45 to be exact. I ended up loving the commute for that very reason - it was so relaxing to set aside thoughts of research and read fiction instead. I even quickly picked up the skill of reading my kindle one-handed while standing and holding onto a pole with the other hand. And the bizarre fact that the trains are silent - nobody talks to each other! - meant I could read in peace and quiet.

Washcloths. Why don't they use them? When I asked our hostess if she had one, she looked at me strangely, eventually figured out that I was asking for a "flannel," and looked at me strangely again after I bought a pair at the grocery store because I was using one to wash my face at night and apparently that's a weird thing to do. She came home with what was basically a linen handkerchief for me, which made my nightly face-wash feel very posh.

Radiator in the bathroom? Brilliant idea! The one in our flat doubled as a handy towel rack, and when the flat got cold and the radiator turned on, we had wonderfully warm towels. On the other hand, fewer bathtubs, and there were days when I dearly missed having a bubble bath.

Despite my mother's long-ago warning that Brits don't drink milk and therefore A) don't sell it in large containers and B) don't have refrigerators large enough to hold large containers even if they existed, in fact they do. Whew. I drink a lot of milk out of habit more than anything else these days. It's just a little bit of a hassle to have to carry their large containers (six pints or 3.4 litres, not exactly a gallon, but close, I think) home from the grocery store via the tube.

Peanut butter in England is depressing. It's more like peanut paste: neither sweet nor creamy. One of the first things both of us want to do upon arriving home is eat a spoonful of peanut butter straight from the jar.

Twinings tea, of which I drink a LOT, is very sensibly packaged. Without each tea bag being individually packaged, I contributed far less to landfills. The box of tea bags also made my cupboard smell nice, since the tea was more open to the air. I imagine this makes the tea lose its flavor faster, but since I drink a lot of tea and it's stronger in England anyway, this didn't turn out to be a problem.

Brits call craft beer "real ale," which we quite appreciate because it implies that anything else is "false ale."

Traditional English cider is still, room temperature, and ridiculously alcoholic, which I learned to my detriment one afternoon at the Queen's Head when I eagerly drank a pint without having eaten anything in a while. I ended up with a splitting headache and was no doubt rather silly while we enjoyed a game of cribbage with our drinks. There are so many varieties of cider available at any British pub - I didn't end up having Strongbow once, because there were so many others to try!

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